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Music: emotion by proxy

I’ve always loved music, in the words of the song, “music was my first love”. From the time when I’d listen to my mother trilling the songs of Dusty Springfield on washday, to my Dad’s Big O and Frank Ifield impressions. From the time I had my first toy glockenspiel and a miniature guitar, through the time my little sister decided she didn’t want to learn to play guitar and I was riff happy to take the axe off her hands (still got it along with a few additions...

 
Journal of Chemical Health & Safety, July-August issue

Here’s what’s in the July-August issue of the Journal of Chemical Health & Safety: Editorial: Re-evaluating an old prejudice, by Harry J. Elson Why is weapons grade plutonium more hazardous to work with than highly enriched uranium?; from Michael E. Cournoyer, Stephen A. Costigan, and Bradley S. Schake (Los Alamos National Laboratory) Occupational exposure to nanomaterials: Assessing the potential for cutaneous exposure to metal oxide nanoparticles in a semiconductor facility; fr...

 
Hamilton syringes
Posted in Chemjobber

A collection of small, useful things (links):This thread at ItP has gone in an interesting direction, where facts are being examined from multiple perspectives.I confess I'd never heard of the "findenser" before. Interesting to see a chemical manufacturing industry critic on the DuPont LaPorte incident. Beryl Lieff Benderly has more of Dr. Naveen Sangji's comments at ACS Boston. I enjoyed this post of See Arr Oh's; surprising to me to see that it wasn't only Gomberg trying to rese...

 
Nettle stings

Wellcome Images describes its 100,000 strong collection of high-resolution images as “one of the world’s richest and most unusual collections”. You cannot deny that making a nettle sting the subject of a photo is an unusual thing to do: The image above is a colourised scanning electron micrograph of the sting cells of a nettle leaf (Urtica dioica). The stings themselves are hollow spikes of silica (sand/glass) that snap easily when your bare knees or other body part brush agai...

 
Missouri cuts health care subsidies for graduate students with less than 24 hours notice
Posted in Chemjobber

A very interesting little story coming out of the University of Missouri. Here's a snippet from the Columbia Daily Tribune (article by Megan Favignano): Graduate students employed by the University of Missouri will have a harder time paying for health insurance after MU told students Friday it is taking away subsidies that help with premium costs. MU Associate Vice Chancellor for Graduate Studies Leona Rubin said the change is the result of a recent IRS interpretation of a section...

 
Key Inmarsat rocket flight 'success'

A rocket mission to put a new spacecraft in orbit for London-based Inmarsat is declared a success....

 
[Immunology] New targets to treat inflammation

Some members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family promote the production of proinflammatory cytokines. As such, these kinases have been targeted for the treatment of – [Read More]...

 
[Quantum Mechanics] Manipulation of a quantum squeeze

The uncertainty principle of quantum mechanics dictates that even when a system is cooled to its ground state, there are still fluctuations. This zero-point motion is unavoidable but – [Read More]...

 
Confidence in parenting could help break cycle of abuse

To understand how confidence in parenting may predict parenting behaviors in women who were abused as children, psychologists have found that mothers who experienced more types of maltreatment as children are more critical of their ability to parent successfully. Intervention programs for moms at-risk, therefore, should focus on bolstering mothers' self-confidence -- not just teach parenting skills, the researchers said....

 
[Applied Optics] Adding communication to light harvesting

Solar cells are often thought of as passive devices sitting on a rooftop, benignly soaking up sunlight and converting it into useful electricity. On the smaller scale, they can be integrated – [Read More]...

 
'Science of Mom': Author Sifts Through Childrearing Facts & Fictions

Some new moms might feel as if they need to be scientists to understand what's best for their babies: Vaccinate on schedule or not? Sink $20 into one of those CDs promising to turn my baby into a genius? Alice Callahan, who earned a Ph.D. in nutritional biology and went to do research on fetal physiology before she had her first child in 2010, decided to tackle motherhood in a way that was most natural to her: as a scientist....

 
10 Years After Hurricane Katrina: Have Weather Forecasts Improved?

The fierce Hurricane Katrina, which devastated the Gulf Coast, taking more than 1,800 lives, made landfall 10 years ago. Overall, meteorologists have a much better sense of where hurricanes will go and how strong they will be than they did before Hurricane Katrina, said Chris Davis, the associate director of the Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Laboratory at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. That's because of a host of factors, from more powerful computers, t...

 
Borderline personality traits linked to lowered empathy

Those with borderline personality disorder, or BPD, a mental illness marked by unstable moods, often experience trouble maintaining interpersonal relationships. New research indicates that this may have to do with lowered brain activity in regions important for empathy in individuals with borderline personality traits....

 
Get your votes in for the "Hiss and Ping" contest
Posted in Chemjobber

Voting for the funniest, most accurate description of an analytical technique closes tonight at midnight Eastern. Go vote! ...

 
<em>MIND</em> Staff Share Their Reading Picks

Reviews and recommendations from Scientific American MIND -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com...

 
Physics Week in Review: August 29, 2015

Hawking makes headlines, LIDAR makes it big in Hollywood, and how to simulate a hurricane on a bubble are among this week's physics highlights. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com...

 
How Does a Gymnast--Or Even a Fitness Walker--Keep From Falling?

The brain constantly strives to reconcile its own internal picture of the world with the incoming sensory flood from eyes, ears and other sensory inputs—a process that lets us run, walk and... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com...

 
Row over Caribbean dolphin parks plan

Turks and Caicos Islands debates marine mammal park...

 
VIDEO: Using science to combat flooding

Scientists at Newcastle University are going in search of floods, trying to learn what causes them so they can prevent future flash flooding....

 
Lucy Liu Welcomes a Baby: 4 Reasons Why Couples Use Surrogates

Actress Lucy Liu has announced the arrival of her baby boy, which she had through the help of a surrogate. Although surrogacy is not very common, there are many reasons why women and couples may chose surrogates to be part of their fertility treatment. The 46-year old Liu made the announcement through Instagram, where she posted a photo of herself holding her son....

 
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