Chemistry News RSS

Special microscope captures defects in nanotubes

Chemists have devised a way to see the internal structures of electronic waves trapped in carbon nanotubes by external electrostatic charges. Carbon nanotubes have been touted as exceptional materials with unique properties that allow for extremely efficient charge and energy transport, with the potential to open the way for new, more efficient types of electronic and photovoltaic devices. However, these traps, or defects, in ultra-thin nanotubes can compromise their effectiveness....

 
A guest post by Chad Jones: "4 things you probably already know about grad school but really shouldn't ignore."
Posted in Chemjobber

CJ's note: Chad wrote this for the blog back when he was defending his dissertation -- he is now Dr. Jones and is working in industry. Soon I'll be defending my dissertation and finishing up my PhD. I also have several friends who are just beginning their graduate career. It’s been a very reflective time for me. I've thought about what advice I would give to those friends just starting grad school (I've also been wondering how helpful that advice would be - after all, I read plenty of...

 
Ancient Human Skulls Reveal When Europeans Could Drink Milk

The DNA from ancient human bones is shedding new light on the prehistory of Europe, such as when changes in skin color and lactose tolerance occurred, researchers say. Scientists examined ancient DNA extracted from 13 individuals in archaeological burial sites unearthed during highway construction in the Great Hungarian Plain in Central Europe. After several years of experimentation with a variety of kinds of bones, the researchers discovered the best place to recover ancient DNA for analysis in...

 
New feather findings get scientists in a flap

Scientists have revealed that feather shafts are made of a multi-layered fibrous composite material, much like carbon fiber, which allows the feather to bend and twist to cope with the stresses of flight. Since their appearance over 150 million years ago, feather shafts (rachises) have evolved to be some of the lightest, strongest and most fatigue resistant natural structures....

 
"...however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority"
Posted in Chemjobber

A reader points out the University of Alberta's interesting "Equal Opportunity" statement for its 3 tenure-track positions for assistant/associate professors in chemistry: "All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority. If suitable Canadian citizens or permanent residents cannot be found, other individuals will be considered. The University of Alberta hires on the basis of merit. We are committed to the principle of...

 
Sun Unleashes Powerful X-Class Solar Flare (Video, Photos)

A monster solar flare erupted early Sunday (Oct. 19) from a huge sunspot that may just be getting warmed up. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) spacecraft captured photos and video of the intense sun storm, which researchers classified as an X1.1 flare. "Since [Sunday's flare], the sunspot has almost doubled in size and developed an increasingly unstable 'beta-gamma-delta' magnetic field," Spaceweather.com's Tony Phillips wrote in an update. AR 2192 has been pointing away from Earth, so its...

 
NASA Webb's heart survives deep freeze test

After 116 days of being subjected to extremely frigid temperatures like that in space, the heart of the James Webb Space Telescope, the Integrated Science Instrument Module and its sensitive instruments, emerged unscathed from the thermal vacuum chamber at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland....

 
Slumbering lions win top photo prize

A black and white image of lions resting on a rock outcrop in the Serengeti has won the 2014 Wildlife Photographer of the Year award....

 
Wind farms outstrip nuclear power

The UK's wind farms generated more power than its nuclear power stations on Tuesday, the National Grid says....

 
King Tut's Health: New Mummy Scans Refute Old Diagnosis of Pharaohs

The royalty of ancient Egypt suffered from an age-related back disorder, according to a new body scan of the mummies of pharaohs. The new research clears up a long-standing mummy misdiagnosis, which held that some rulers who lived between about 1492 B.C. and 1153 B.C. had a painful inflammatory disorder called ankylosing spondylitis. "We are now questioning the reality that ankylosing spondylitis is actually an ancient disease," said study researcher Sahar Saleem of the Kasr Al Ainy Faculty of M...

 
Acoustic tags track 'frenzy swimming' in baby sea turtles

First-of-its-kind study traces migrations of tiny loggerheads...

 
Physics reveals how nature sparkles

Researchers reveal that the same physical mechanism is behind many of nature's most dazzling shines....

 
I've never heard of a "chemistry engineer", Mr. President.
Posted in Chemjobber

Courtesy of Twitter user @cjt217, I see that the White House (or whichever junior deputy vice associate general special assistant to the President who wrote this letter) has invented a new term for "chemical engineers." Ah, well.(Found in the third or fourth page of the October 13 issue of C&EN.)...

 
Removing gloves and other protective equipment

One of the things highlighted in the news this week is the risks of contamination from removing—”doffing”—personal protective equipment. “Meticulous removal, or doffing, of PPE is as important as its meticulous donning,” wrote infectious disease physician Amesh A. Adalja in “Ebola Lessons We Need To Learn From Dallas.” Most chemists don’t need to fear Ebola, but they do wear PPE to protect from chemical exposure. I asked Iowa State Universit...

 
When backpacking, it pays to be small

Smaller hikers better at carrying heavy loads...

 
NASA snaps first-ever pic of a long-period comet's core

Siding Spring originated in the Oort cloud...

 
[Infectious Disease] Taking the temperature of virulence

Cholera kills more than 100,000 people yearly and results from consuming food or water contaminated with Vibrio cholerae. The bacterium only expresses virulence factors, proteins – [Read More]...

 
[Skill Development] Learning requires the brain to change

We may be leveraging change in our brains more than we have thought. Ohayon et al. knocked out cells responsible for laying down insulating myelin along neuronal axons in the – [Read More]...

 
[Planetary Geology] What's inside Saturn's tiniest moon?

The icy body Mimas is the smallest of Saturn's main moons, only slightly wider than Switzerland. Like our own Moon, Mimas is tidally locked in its orbit and shows nearly the same face – [Read More]...

 
[Mammal Digit Number] Protein sorting sets digit number

Like human fingers and toes, mice have five digits on their front and back paws. To better understand the molecular mechanism behind this, Handschuh et al. studied mice with – [Read More]...

 
Add a chemistry news source